Alcoholism Coach.com

Sponsoring or Coaching in Recovery from Alcoholism



  • Recovery Is Sexy.com is For Sale



    for_sale_signRecoveryIsSexy.com has led a revolution in how recovery is viewed/ considered – without ignoring spiritual principles. From humble beginings the altruistic factual principles of the site have become part of the recovery experience for many – and growing.

    Based on the 12 Step fellowships it includes over 1,500 articles on ‘relationships in recovery’, alcoholism, co-dependency, gambling, drug addiction, ACOA’s, sexuality, sex addiction and more.

    The sale includes 2 extra sites – Alcohol Coach.com and Alcoholism Coach.com.

    With over 6,000 Twitter followers and 5,000 Facebook friends and many other sites linking in the Recovery Is Sexy.com network is extensive.

    Related Reading:

    Under the Influence: A Guide to the Myths and Realities of Alcoholism
    Recovery--the Sacred Art: The Twelve Steps As Spiritual Practice (Art of Spiritual Living)
    Addiction: Understanding Addictions
    Addiction
    I Need To Stop Drinking!

    Posted in 12 Step, Addiction, Alcoholism, Co-dependency, Recovery and tagged . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    Relatives of alcoholics share trauma

    “The entire purpose of my life had been to see my father sober but even after I had succeeded, I couldn’t be happy. My life was void of meaning. Other people couldn’t understand it. Honestly, neither could I. I used to think that some sick part of me wanted my father to keep drinking so that it would give purpose to my own life. If it hadn’t been for Al-Anon, I might have even killed myself,” recalls a member of Al-Anon.

    Al-Anon and Alateen are twin international fellowships – also known as the Al-Anon Family groups – designed with the sole purpose of helping those families that are adversely affected by alcoholism. While Al-Anon supports family members and friends of alcoholics, Alateen helps young people, generally between the ages of 13-19, whose lives have been affected by drinking.

    Relatives of alcoholics share trauma – The Times of India.

    Related Reading:

    Codependents' Guide to the Twelve Steps
    The Twelve Steps for Christians
    The Family Book
    The 12 Steps : A Way Out : A Spiritual Process for Healing
    Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions

    Posted in 12 Step, Al-anon / Alateen, Alcohol, Alcoholics Anonymous, Co-dependency, Family, Recovery and tagged , , , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    12 Step Participation Lowers Depression

    Relations between 12-step Attendance, Depression, and Substance Use in Patients with Comorbid Substance Dependence and Major Depression.

    Among patients with substance dependence and comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) receiving treatment, we examined if differences in depression were mediated by 12-step involvement, and if the effects of 12-Step involvement on future alcohol and drug use were mediated by reductions in depression.

    We examined 209 armed forces veterans diagnosed with alcohol, stimulant, or marijuana dependence and substance-independent MDD.

    We measured Twelve-step attendance and affiliation, depression severity, percent days drinking, and percent days using drugs assessed at the beginning and at 3, 6, and 9 Months.

    Findings

    1. Greater 12-step meeting attendance predicted lower depression and mediated the superior depression outcomes of the TSF group, explaining 24.3% of the group difference in depression.
    2. Lower depression severity predicted lower future alcohol use and mediated the effects of 12-step meetings, explaining 15.7% of their effects on future drinking.
    3. Depression had unique associations with 12-step meeting attendance and future drinking.

    Conclusions

    For patients with substance dependence and MDD, attendance at 12-step meetings is associated with mental health benefits that extend beyond substance use, and reduced depression could be a key mechanism whereby 12-step meetings reduce future drinking in these people.

    Mediational Relations between 12-step Attendance, Depression, and Substance Use in Patients with Comorbid Substance Dependence and Major Depression. Matthew J. Worley, Susan R. Tate, Sandra A. Brown, Addiction 2012.

    Related Reading:

    Beautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction
    The Life Recovery Bible, Personal Size NLT
    Recovery: A Guide for Adult Children of Alcoholics
    Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
    Mental Health Nursing (6th Edition)

    Posted in 12 Step, Addiction, Alcoholism, Mental Health, Recovery and tagged , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    AA Speaker Tapes – MP3

    A new collection of Speaker Tapes has been found in America.

    The collection of MP3 tracks includes;

    • Alcoholics Anonymous
    • AA Founders
    • AA Pioneers
    • Big Book Authors
    • Al-anon
    • Narcotics Anonymous

    This library of tapes is estimated at 50,000 on wire recordings, reel-to-reel tapes, cassettes and dates back to the 1940′s. Collected by Bill and Arbutus O’Neal of Texas.

    This collection is progressively being converted to MP3 however there are currently several hundred available for free down load.

    These AA speaker tapes are mostly American but there are talks from Australia, Britain, Germany and Tokyo.

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    Related Reading:

    Recovery: A Guide for Adult Children of Alcoholics
    Fast Track
    The Big Book   of Alcoholics Anonymous
    The Cure for Alcoholism: The Medically Proven Way to Eliminate Alcohol Addiction
    Everything I Never Wanted to Be: A Memoir of Alcoholism and Addiction, Faith and Family, Hope and Humor

    Posted in Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Co-dependency, MP3 Tracks, Recovery and tagged , , , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    Al?Anon Works

    Building Healthy Relationship With One’s Self In Al-Anon

    As a family recovery coach, my radar goes up when I hear clients talking about how much someone else’s drinking is bothering them. What the drinker’s actual diagnosis is or isn’t, is not important to me. If their drinking is bothering my client, I gently begin asking questions to help me better understand just how much of a problem it is to my client. Often, these conversations lead me to put Al?Anon on my list of recommendations for the client.

    You may wonder why I want my clients to go to Al?Anon, when I’m specially trained to help the family members of alcoholics. The short answer to that question is that Al?Anon works.

    The people who have been going to Al?Anon meetings for a very long time have discovered the secret of living well and enjoying their own lives whether their alcoholic relatives choose sobriety or not.

    The clients I’ve sent to meetings progress faster toward the coaching goals they have set, become more able to deal with other aspects of their lives more effectively, and grow happier over time, regardless of their alcoholic’s choices.

    I work hand in hand with the Al?Anon program and its Twelve Steps because Al?Anon facilitates the re?emergence of inner health on the outer level. Al?Anon is the program of relationships, beginning with building a healthy relationship with one’s self. And more than anything else, those related to alcoholics need support in rebuilding a healthy relationship with themselves because that’s where family recovery begins.

    Beverly A. Buncher, MA, CEC, LTPC

    Family Recovery Coach

    Pompano Beach, Florida

    Related Reading:

    As a Man Thinketh
    Recovery
    Recovery--the Sacred Art: The Twelve Steps As Spiritual Practice (Art of Spiritual Living)
    The Men Of CLE-FD The Orlando Torres Story
    Recovery: Star Wars (The New Jedi Order) (Short Story): Darth Maul (Star Wars: The New Jedi Order)

    Posted in Al-anon / Alateen, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Co-dependency, Men, Recovery, Women and tagged , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    Cancer and Alcohol Risks

    Alcohol consumption is a major risk factor for cancer

    Among male and female lifetime consumers, the risk for all the cancers increases with each additional drink a day.

    Regular consumption of even 18g of alcohol per day increases the risk of breast cancer (18g is equivalent to just under: 2 regular glasses of wine or champagne, 1.3 pints of beer or nearly 6cl of whiskey)

    Likewise, it is confirmed  an increased  risk in colorectal cancer for regular drinkers of 50g of alcohol per day.

    Together, smoking and alcohol have a synergistic effect on cancer risk, meaning the combined effects of use are significantly greater than the sum of individual risks.

    Alcohol use may contribute to weight (fat) gain, and greater body fatness is a convincing cause of cancer of the oesophagus, pancreas, bowel, endometrium, kidney and breast.

    Alcohol attributable cancers:

    - Upper airway tract (44%)

    - liver cancer

    - bowel cancer

    - colorectal cancer (17%)

    - breast cancer (5%)

    Even though light to moderate alcohol consumption might decrease the risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality, the net effect of alcohol is harmful. Thus, alcohol consumption should not be recommended to prevent cardiovascular disease or all cause mortality.

    Combined effects of drinking and smoking

    For some cancers the combined effects of drinking alcohol and smoking tobacco greatly exceed the risk from either factor alone. Compare with non-smoking non drinkers, the approximate relative risks for developing mouth and throat cancers are up to 7 times greater for people who smoke tobacco, up to 6 times greater for those who drink alcohol, but more than 35 times greater for those who are regular, heavy users of both substances.

    Combined effect of alcohol and smoking has been estimated to be responsible for more than 75% of cancer of the upper airway (throat, mouth etc) tract.

    Alcohol and weight gain

    From nutritional point of view, alcoholic drinks represent ‘empty calories’- they are high in calories but low in nutritional value; alcohol itself has a comparatively high energy content.Alcohol provides extra calories and slows fat and carbohydrate oxidation.

    Alcohol as well as being direct cause of several cancer, might also contribute indirectly to those cancers associated with excess body fatness. There is convincing evidence that body fatness increases the risk of cancers of the oesophagus, pancreas, bowel, breast, endometrium and kidney.

    Alcohol and heart disease

    Earlier research which reported that low to moderate levels of alcohol consumption might reduce the incidence of heat disease might not have been fully accurate.  The potential benefits of moderate alcohol consumption on heart disease appear to be limited to middle aged and older people.

    World Health Organisation  stated back in 2007 that ‘ (…)from both the public health and clinical viewpoints, there is no merit in promoting  alcohol consumption as a preventative strategy (…)’

    Related Reading:

    Stop Drinking Start Living!
    Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex
    Alcohol: How to Give It Up and Be Glad You Did
    Drink: A Cultural History of Alcohol
    Buzzed: The Straight Facts About the Most Used and Abused Drugs from Alcohol to Ecstasy (Third Edition)

    Posted in Alcohol, Alcoholism, Men, Women and tagged , , , , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    Keep Coming Back

    The Higher Power will be Revealed

    Recently I came away from a meeting emotionally upset, when a young man stated that he could not “cop” the Alcoholics Anonymous programme because of the word God. I would like to try and express my views on this, in the hope they may help another non-believer.

    I had a religious upbringing and find the word God easy to accept, but I had to be spiritually beaten before I found sobriety.

    Many times I have heard that AA is a learning programme. To me, the believer, religion is also a learning programme; it simply teaches us about God, and right and wrong. AA teaches us about God (as we understand Him), or a Higher Power, and how to lead a happy sober life.

    Alcoholism, we are told, is a three fold disease – physical, mental and spiritual.

    When I first accepted the AA programme, I was so physically ill, I wished to die; so mentally ill, I was incapable of making any decision for myself and had to be guided like a child; but it was only when I was so spiritually ill, and felt I had no one or nothing to believe in, or turn to, that I fully accepted the AA program. It was what I now call my “spiritual awakening.”

    It is something I can’t explain – it is just an experience that happened. I felt humble, serene and I lost all desire to pick up a drink. I hope and pray that the feeling remains with me for the rest of my life.

    All I can say is, if one doesn’t believe, don’t try! Just keep coming to AA and listen to the speakers with an open mind. Sooner or later, if you are an alcoholic (a sick person because it is a disease), when you are ready, physically, mentally and spiritually, you will come to believe in something, whether it be God, a Higher Power, the Man Upstairs, or whatever you may choose to call it.

    Marion I.

    Related Reading:

    Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book, 4th Edition
    The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous (Including Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions)
    Alcoholics Anonymous - How To Be An Effective Sponsor In Recovery with AA
    The Vitamin Cure for Alcoholism: How to Protect Against and Fight Alcoholism Using Nutrition and Vitamin Supplementation
    Under the Influence: A Guide to the Myths and Realities of Alcoholism

    Posted in Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Recovery and tagged , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    AA Works in Russia Too

    Russians Warily Turn to Alcoholics Anonymous in Battle With Alcohol

    One-time Russian prisoner Andrei tried to quit drinking 22 times, going for cures that lasted from one to six months. But each time, he went back to the bottle. Then 14 years ago, the 58-year-old tried Alcoholics Anonymous, attracted by the different approach, which was not about doctors reprimanding the drinker, but taking personal responsibility.

    And after going through the 12-step programme five times, the Muscovite with deeply-furrowed face and intense dark eyes, said he felt confident he could stay dry.

    The Alcoholics Anonymous method of treating alcoholism first came to Russia from the United States more than 20 years ago, but is still not mainstream in a country where hard drinking is often viewed as inevitable and ingrained in the national psyche.

    The AA movement of “mutual aid” groups created in the United States in the 1930s first came to Russia at the end of the 1980s during the perestroika era, as the country opened up under the last Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Yet more than 20 years later, Russia has just 400 AA groups with 10,000 members—a tiny number for a population of 143 million where alcohol abuse and its social effects are a national scourge.
    Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-russians-warily-aa-alcohol.html#jCp

    Related Reading:

    The 12-Step Buddhist: Enhance Recovery from Any Addiction
    The Twelve Steps for Christians
    Alcoholics Anonymous Big Book Trade Edition
    The 12 Steps : A Way Out : A Spiritual Process for Healing
    The Vitamin Cure for Alcoholism: How to Protect Against and Fight Alcoholism Using Nutrition and Vitamin Supplementation

    Posted in 12 Step, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Recovery and tagged , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    Alcohol Myths

    Woman toasting with alcoholic martini Test your knowledge of alcohol-related risks and find out the facts about drinking. Can you tell fact from fiction?

    There are so many stories around alcohol and drinking that it’s hard to know what to believe.

    Knowing the facts about how drinking affects your body is the best way to make sure you drink safely.

    Below are some common myths around drinking. Read on to find out the real facts about alcohol.

    Myth: Drinking makes sex better

    Truth: Alcohol can help you avoid feeling awkward or can help you feel more confident. But it can keep men from getting or keeping an erection, and it can reduce sex drive. More importantly, you might put yourself in a risky situation or you might not use a condom, putting you at greater risk of a sexually transmitted disease or an unwanted pregnancy.

    Myth: Beer gets you less drunk.

    Truth:

    • An average pint of beer
    • large glass of wine
    • a ‘large’ double vodka

    all have around 2.8 units of alcohol .This is what makes you drunk chemically, and the faster you drink the full 2.8 units, the higher your peak blood level.

    Myth: Switching between beer, wine, and spirits will make you more drunk.

    Truth: Your blood alcohol content is what determines how drunk you are. Mixing drinks may make you sicker by upsetting your stomach, but not more intoxicated.

    Myth: A big meal before you drink will keep you sober.

    Truth: Drinking on a full stomach will delay alcohol getting into your system, not prevent it. However, it is best to eat a proper meal before a night out, especially foods rich in carbohydrates and proteins.

    Myth: Your body develops a tolerance to alcohol, so you can safely drink more

    Truth: The more you drink the more damage your body will sustain and the greater the risks become. Tolerance to alcohol can actually be seen as a warning sign that your body has started to be affected by too much drinking.

    Alcohol’s hidden harms usually only emerge after a couple of years. And by then, serious health problems can have developed.

    Keeping to NHS recommended limits will reduce the risk of alcohol harming your health:

    • Men should not exceed 3-4 units a day on a regular basis;
    • Women should not exceed 2-3 units a day on a regular basis.

    Source: NHS Choices

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    Related Reading:

    Alcohol Lied to Me : The Intelligent Way to Escape Alcohol Addiction
    Stop Drinking Start Living!
    Drink: A Cultural History of Alcohol
    Buzzed: The Straight Facts About the Most Used and Abused Drugs from Alcohol to Ecstasy (Third Edition)
    Alcohol lied to me (the intelligent escape from alcohol addiction)

    Posted in Alcohol and tagged , , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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    AA Sponsors

    Recovery Characteristics and Practices of Alcoholics Anonymous Sponsors – research

    Objectives: Sponsoring another member of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is associated with improved substance use outcomes, but little research examines who is asked (and agrees) to sponsor another member. The objective of this exploratory study is to describe the recovery-related characteristics and practices associated with AA sponsors.

    Methods: AA members (263) completed an anonymous online questionnaire about their background and recovery behaviors. On 9 characteristics and 4 practices tests were used to compare (a) current nonsponsors with sponsors; and (b) lifetime nonsponsors with those who had sponsored at some point.

    Results:

    How and when members entered AA had no association with the sponsor role.

    Sponsors, past and present, were characterized by

  • having an AA home group,
  • completing more steps,
  • having longer sobriety, and
  • reporting a greater degree of spiritual surrender.

    Current sponsors engaged more frequently than current nonsponsors in all 4 of the following practices:

  • performing AA service work,
  • attending meetings,
  • praying or meditating, and
  • reading AA literature.

    Lifetime sponsors engaged more frequently than lifetime nonsponsors in all practices except praying or meditating. Evidence suggested lifetime nonsponsors and former sponsors did not differ in AA practices, indicating the value of current/active sponsorship.

    Conclusions: Similar to having a sponsor, being a sponsor is associated with characteristics and practices supportive of AA engagement.

    By Young, Lance Brendan PhD, MBA, Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment: 6 October 2011

  • Related Reading:

    The Big Book   of Alcoholics Anonymous
    Everything I Never Wanted to Be: A Memoir of Alcoholism and Addiction, Faith and Family, Hope and Humor
    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition
    Alcoholics Anonymous Big Book Workbook: Working the Program
    The Sober Truth: Debunking the Bad Science Behind 12-Step Programs and the Rehab Industry

    Posted in 12 Step, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism and tagged , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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